Tuesday, January 19, 2021

soundtrackism - Acen + Eno

In the new issue of The Wire, I have a big review of Trip to the Moon 2092, a six-disc vinyl expansion of the Acen classic "Trip II the Moon" - widely considered the greatest hardcore rave anthem ever, and  originally released through the summer of 1992 in three successive versions, each more tempestuous and grandiloquent than the last. The 2092 box set is out any day now on Kniteforce Revolution. In addition to the print-magazine-only review, at The Wire website there is an interview with Acen Razvi. He gave me the lowdown on his journey from breakdancing on a sheet of lino in West London to building breakbeat symphonies for Willesden label Production House and talked about his love of film soundtracks (John Barry's Bond music and Ennio Morricone's "Chi Mai" being key sample sources for "Trip" and the killer B-side "Life and Crimes of a Ruffneck"). 

Talking of the movies...  the winter 2020-2021 issue of Sight & Sound features my interview with Brian Eno about his career-long involvement in making music for film and TV, the influence soundtracks and scores have had on his ideas about sound, and what he's been watching during the pandemic. The piece is pegged to his new compilation Film Music 1976-2020.  It was a real delight chatting with Mr. Eno  - I can't remember the last time I laughed so much in an interview. 



              the other electrifying sample in "Trip II the Moon" - electrocuted diva Maureen Mason - here sounds freakily mellow in the original Tongue N Cheek Britsoul fave


                                           

                  look for the shadowy rave magus Acen amidst the amazing dancing twins (not actually twins apparently)


The "River Deep, Mountain High" of rave is how I described  this mix of "Windows" here once 


More box sets from Kniteforce coming this year I'm told, including one for this track, Acen's debut







 

Monday, January 18, 2021

Repeater Radio launches today!

Launching today is a new venture from Repeater Books - Repeater Radio 

The first two days broadcast, Monday Jan 18 and Tuesday Jan 19, are open-access and streaming right now (6pm to 8 pm GMT).

Here's the Repeater announcement: 

"We are starting small with two hours of original programming per night streamed live on our stand-alone platform.

"In the first two weeks we will launch shows from Repeater writers. Tommy Sissons (A Small Man’s England) presents Rebel Reading List looking at the history of working class literature. Philosopher Tom Whyman (Infinitely Full of Hope), hosts a panel discussion show Time Out Of Joint. Kit Mackintosh (Neon Screams) has a series of mixes exploring the last 15 years of “future music”. Grafton Tanner on the Delusioneering at the centre of neoliberalism.

"All of this plus Michael Grasso on the music of his early-’90s adolescence in Alternatives at the End of History. We Are The Mutants on the pop and outsider culture of the Cold War era (including previews of their coming book on film for Repeater).  Daniel Evans (Desolation Radio)  looking at the petite bourgeoisie, Conscious Lyrics with Julia Digital on female representation in Drum and  Bass and Jungle, Kieran Press-Reynolds’s plunge into the deep end of the internet, Ctrl-Alt-RepeatNed Ward’s weekly literature show Foul Young Mouths.

"As me move into February and beyond we will also be airing Rhian E Jones’ (Clampdown, Paint your Town Red) discussion show on everything you ever wanted to know about Wales, Mariam Rezaei on Turntablism, Grace Blakeley (Stolen) in conversation, Eli Davis (Under My Thumb) and Rhian Jones on the intersections of culture, politics and gender with Handbags and Gladrags, Caroline Diezyn on the history of the Rider-Waite-Smith Tarot, and Jenny Anckorn on the UK art school experience.

"There will be ongoing contributions from Andy Sharp (English Heretic) Matt Colquhoun (Egress, Xenogothic) and a one-off show from Joy White (Terraformed). In addition, legendary facilitator of all things underground Jonny Mugwump (Neon Hospice, Exotic Pylon) will be curating a series of sets and shows from Rebecca Lambert (Lady Liminal), DJ Bunnyhausen & DJ Sarma, Veronica Avola, Lucy Sames, Sophie Cooper and New Noveta.

"We will also be hosting some one-off shows and online events around upcoming Repeater releases, starting in late February with The Repeater Book of the Occult and in March for Lesley Chow’s You’re History.

"It’s called Repeater Radio but will feature audio, video and live streams, film, music and mixes. We have big plans of course, and for that we need to paywall. Five pounds a month for the daily content, 10 pounds a month for the broadcast plus access to the weekly archive, with more tiers, more programming and more features to come from April.

"We will be broadcasting across time-zones to make sure everyone has access. To sign up for more information and get access to the full schedule and show description go here."


And here's Kieran Press-Reynolds's announcement about his Repeater Radio show 

CTRL ALT REPEAT


"Very thrilled to announce that I have a digital culture focused show called CTRL ALT REPEAT coming out on the brand new Repeater Radio channel! My first segment is a 4-episode series on the history of how video game soundtracks & pop music have impacted each other. Make sure to sign up and stay tuned."

Kieran makes his debut this Thursday, January 21. Times below GMT.

Kieran Press-Reynolds in conversation with Carl Neville - 20:00-21:00 Kieran Press-Reynolds | Ctrl Alt Repeat #1 - 21:00-22:00

www.repeater-radio.com  

Friday, January 15, 2021

Mask On

Here's a piece that was fun to write - a history of people in pop who wore masks or otherwise heavily disguised their appearance with make-up, including the late MF DOOM, the five-years-late David Bowie, The Residents, Slipknot, Daft Punk, and more. For Tidal.com.








Wednesday, January 13, 2021

mouth music (peak squeak)

Kieran Press-Reynolds deliriously reviews Playboi Carti's delirious Whole Lotta Red

(Ignore the stupid headline, which was not his handiwork).

Here's what Kieran says by way of introduction: "I've written many album reviews. This one, though, is special. I've been waiting two years, two years of trawling through forums for leaks and staying up late expecting the album to drop only to be disappointed. So hyped that I finally got the chance to review this intoxicatingly incoherent mind-trip. It feels a little strange, given everything that's happening in the world, to write so seriously about baby voices and alien gurgle-rap, but hey, sometimes the stupidly fun things are the most comforting, distracting in times of distress."

Sunday, January 10, 2021

The Secrets of 'Gardens'

 Fancy some fragrant respite from non-stop insanity and evil? Here's my essay on Virginia Astley's ambient cult classic From Gardens Where We Feel Secure, the British tradition of rhapsodic pastoralism, and the post-postpunk microtrend for Wide Brimmed Hat Pop. Part of Pitchfork's 'Sunday Review' series of appreciations of lost classics and significant albums they never covered because, well, the magazine didn't, exist yet, did it?














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